A truck delivering a load of gravel

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Thursday June 10

Rain rain go away

We had a very wet start to winter this year. Concrete trucks are very heavy. You can see where this is going…

 

Removing the topsoil to form the driveway

Removing the topsoil to form the driveway

 

In order to get access from the road to the building site we had to construct a driveway around 70m long. This involved first scraping the layer of topsoil off with a little (3.5 ton) excavator, spreading the gravel with the excavator, and then track-rolling (running the excavator back and forth) the gravel to compact it and flatten out for trucks to drive on.

 

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The excavator track rolling the gravel on the driveway

Just in the nick of time

We had anticipated needing around 5 truck loads of gravel, however it became apparent as the gravel was spread and trucks continued to sink into the mud that we would need more gravel, much more. With time running out before the first concrete truck was due to arrive I ended up sourcing gravel from THREE different companies. The last gravel truck arrived only a couple of hours before the first concrete truck. After a couple of stressful days it proved a huge relief to see a full concrete truck reach the building site without disappearing into the mud. The base for the driveway was laid: 9 truck loads;  110 tons of gravel; $3,450.

 

The first concrete truck. They look heavy - they are

The first concrete truck. They look heavy – they are

 

Here’s a tip: wet gravel weighs more than dry gravel – you get more material for your money if the weather is good.

Trucks. Lots of them

Just to give you an idea of how important it is to provide good access to a building site: a total of 21 trucks used the driveway in the first 10 days of construction. If any of them had got stuck or was unable to get close enough it could have effected the entire schedule – not what you want, especially if you have a tight deadline.

 

The first delivery truck - structural steel for the footings and slab

The first delivery truck – structural steel for the footings and slab

 

The morning of pouring the slab: one concrete truck waits for the other to leave

The morning of pouring the slab: one concrete truck waits for the other to leave

Costs: gravel – $3,450; excavator – $1030

 

Disclaimer: Any advice contained within this blog is of a general nature only and cannot be relied upon. Details provided are in good faith and relate specifically to this project. Any author will not be held responsible for advice or information presented.

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