Let it flow: Ian attaching the downpipe to the guttering

Guttering & Cover Strips

Monday February 1

Keeping it in the family

It’s handy having a brother as a painter. Gordon gave the cement sheet two coats of clear sealer, first cutting in the edges with a brush and then using a roller. This work was done a couple of months earlier – well before the cover strips went on. The generous roof overhang in each direction provides decent cover from most of the weather – the sealer offers extra protection from driving rain.

 

Overhead - Gordon rolling on the clear sealer to the cement sheet cladding

Overhead :Gordon rolling on the clear sealer to the cement sheet cladding

 

Up where the spiders live: roller on a pole makes reaching the high areas easy

Up where the spiders live: roller on a pole makes reaching the high areas easy

Timber cover

The edges (joins) of the cement sheet are covered with a timber cover strip for added protection. The timber is from the test run of weatherboards that were milled from the trees onsite. The general strategy for timber on 60k House is to oil the end grain of any exposed timber to prevent water soaking up the grain; the rest is left to weather naturally if undercover or not structural.

 

Light and shade: the roof overhang provides good cover to the high cladding

Light and shade: the roof overhang provides good cover to the high cladding

 

Easy does it: nailing the timber cover strips

Easy does it: nailing the timber cover strips

 

The cover strips were mostly dry but still a little bit green when they were nailed in place with a small nail gun. They haven’t been oiled or painted, just left natural. I’m trying to avoid paint or applied finished as much as possible to keep the materials honest and expressed – don’t tell my brother, but wish I had told Ian who was expecting me to paint the downpipe and the grey elbows…

 

Lines up: the timber cover strips at the verandah gable end

Lines up: the timber cover strips at the verandah gable end

 

Plumbed in: the overhead downpipe connected to the guttering

Plumbed in: the overhead downpipe connected to the guttering

Half

The guttering profile used isn’t a true half round but has a flat section on the back against the fascia – it looks like a half round but costs half the price of a half round (and the brackets are cheaper too). Once the pops are cut out for the downpipe they are sealed before clipping the gutter into place in the brackets. The elbows and the downpipe are then attached, with the downpipe held in place with brackets against the timber cover strips.

 

Last one: Ian fixing the final gutter bracket in place

Last one: Ian fixing the final gutter bracket in place

 

Smelly: gluing the elbows to the downpipe

Smelly: gluing the elbows to the downpipe

Gravity

The downpipe was kept high – above the windows – so it can continue straight into the water tank. This is the most efficient and healthy way, but not the most common. Many houses have ‘charged’ downpipes – the downpipes go down into the ground and then back up to the top of a tank. This uses more pipe, requires digging, and the pipes are charged because they have water constantly sitting in the low section until it rains next to push the water into the tank.

 

Up high: the downpipe above the windows and tucked against the wall

Up high: the downpipe above the windows and tucked against the wall

Fill it up

It’s a good feeling knowing your roof is now harvesting rain and the water you drink from the tap is yours. Unfortunately Ian didn’t have enough pipe to finish the downpipe on the other side and hasn’t done it yet. That’s OK – after the recent rain we’ve had the water tank is full. Hydro Tasmania should be so lucky.

 

Let it flow: the downpipe running to the water tank

Let it flow: the downpipe running to the water tank

 

Quick fix: temporary arrangements for the other gutter

Quick fix: temporary arrangements for the other gutter

 

Costs: cover strips – $0; painter – $0; plumber – $1600

 

Disclaimer: Any advice contained within this blog is of a general nature only and cannot be relied upon. Details provided are in good faith and relate specifically to this project. Any author will not be held responsible for advice or information presented.

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